Archive for January, 2019

Haters: 2 – Author: 0

Monday, January 14th, 2019

Since my tastes run contrary to the mainstream often, I tend to fall into the hipster trap, where if eveone say that something is bad, I expect it to be good. But obviously it’s a logical fallacy, and I’m getting it with two big titles: Slime (Reincardated As) and Demon Lord (How Not To Summon). Both are based on LN and produced quality spin-off manga.

In case of the Slime it is just as boring as everyone is saying. It drags mercilessly through the story. The only good thing was the matter-of-fact personality of Rimuru, the protagonist. Also, all the plotting connections are inherited from the LN, and thus quite craftily done. In other source, plot advancements, like the craftsmen whom you need become exiled right when you need them, might be seen as a little too convenient, but in Slime thing have proper casual relationships. Would be nice to read it, I suspect. Watching though… I’m having trouble.

For the Demon Lord, I asked Ana-sempai about it, and she mostly complained about groping. Honestly, I thought she was reading too much Tumblr. Then I watched a few episodes, and oh boy. In the manga, if the hero wakes up and finds himself spreading over one of his slave girls, it’s a visual gag for 2 frames. In the anime, it’s the main attraction that crowds out the other aspects. In addition, I just can’t get used to the appearance of the characters. The only two normal-looking people are Diablo himself and Rem. Seira is a walking chest. Ceres is ugly big time. The bunny guildmaster looks just wrong, with the brown tail. Although I saw Alicia in previews only, she already seemed badly done. The mangaka captured her stern beauty and tortured personality perfectly. But whoever did the character designs did not. Perhaps the LN illustrations are to blame.

Oh well. Here’s a splash from ED that has nothing to do with the anime itself:

John on American Otaku

Thursday, January 10th, 2019

Welp:

The default Japanese image of an otaku is the opposite of outgoing, active, and youthful. Yet particularly in America, especially in the two-thousand-teens, anime has taken on the image that watching anime makes one cool. The entire point of the “Stay Crunchy” ad is to illustrate the idea that immersing in anime makes viewers popular, trendy, special.

I have to ask though, is Japan is ripe for the change as well. At work, I have to interact with the Japanese, and the number of anime watchers and gamers are higher than in U.S., if anything. They are not particularly asocial. One iM@S P among them has 3 kids.