Anime Viking on Daisuki

July 29th, 2014 by Author

This is what happens when you extensively research propaganda and PR declarations by corporate suits and then take them on face value (in particular Shibata’a promises of not strong-arming Crunchy):

In other words, Daisuki was meant as a complement to the already existing anime streaming websites. The purpose was not to remove series from other platforms or trying to gain exclusive users.

And that’s after he quotes “DAISUKI is a new service created by real anime companies that have continued to create Japanese anime.”

I think it was plain as day that the main goal of Daisuki was to crush Crunchyroll, remove the middleman, and reap the harvest of profits in the interest of Japanese anime incumbents such as Toei, Kadokawa, and Aniplex. It is true that they did not pull licenses, but they simulcasted Zvezda that was shown at Crunchy with a week’s delay for free users.

My personal experience with Daisuki was rather positive, by comparison at least. American TV incumbent, Hulu, was quite terrible in not having a tablet-compatible client (they have one for their paid offering Hulu+ only) and badly overloading with ads. Daisuki worked well on iPad and its ads were sensible. But most importantly, I was finally able to watch 35 episodes of DBZ, the entire first arc, after years and years of aborted attempts with FUNi and Hulu (that was a horrifying experience that I left off Ani-nouto as a service to readers). In addition, Zvezda. I would not mind switching, it’s just that Crunchy is way ahead in the selection.

In the end, Daisuki’s narrow library is truly puzzling. Perhaps it’s going to get padded over time.

UPDATE: These doofuses still don’t have an app in Google Play. They have one in iTunes.

Avatar e-mailed me with a somewhat longish expose of the ways Japanese in effect undermine themselves when dealing with international markets, which comes down to this:

So it wouldn’t surprise me at all if Daisuki had some of the same problems — being managed by people for whom Daisuki’s success is not particularly important and who have their own parochial concerns that get in the way.

The web presence they built is very slick. The store looks nice. But there’s too little in it. It would make no sense for them to have trouble acquiring titles, being born from the flesh of Aniplex et.al., and yet…